John Schuman, Ontario Family Lawyer/Divorce Lawyer and Children’s Rights Advocate, on Television

John Schuman, Certified Specialist, Toronto Lawyer, appearing on Television


As an expert in family law and children’s rights, Certified Specialist, John Schuman, does many television appearances to speak about family law, divorce, custody, access, child support, spousal support and property division issues affecting married, common-law, separating and divorcing couples.  Here are some of those TV appearances that both provided important family law information and show John's skills, knowledge and experience as a family lawyer and divorce lawyer.

How to Challenge Your Child’s Suspension or Expulsion from School



Suspending or expelling a child from school are the most severe punishments that can be imposed on a pupil.  Not only do these punishments deprive children of their right to an education, but they also can damage the student’s reputation and affect their future educational prospects. Although school principals and boards are required to impose these punishments only for the most severe type of behaviour, and only after considering whether there are mitigating factors that should lead to a less severe punishment, there are times that they make mistakes and children are wrongly suspended or expelled. 


In this video, Toronto education lawyer, John Schuman, goes over the legal rights that students and parents have when facing a suspension or expulsion from school.  He explains the essential education law that they need to know when facing this serious form of school discipline  It is important for pupils and their parents to understand their rights before making any decisions about  when facing a suspension or expulsion from school.


If your child has been suspended or expelled it, is important to speak to an education lawyer immediately.  The time lines for appeals are short - and there may even be things the lawyer can help you do before bringing an appeal to resolve matters.   Suspensions stay on a student’s records and expulsions obviously not only stay on the student’s record but profoundly affect his or her education.  To contact Ontario Education Lawyer, John Schuman, call the 416-446-5847, email him, of the page, or use the form below.


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What Parents Need to Know About the Ontario Law of Children’s Aid Societies and Child Abuse


Parents are justifiably terrified when they learn that a children’s aid society is investigating them for possibly abusing or neglecting their children.  CAS’s have lots of powers, not just to do investigations, but to take kids away and place them in foster care.  There is always the concern that the CAS may get the information wrong and make a mistake that could harm the children, or unnecessarily damage, separate, or destroy a family. 


Knowing how to act and respond when a children’s aid society calls can really help parents. John Schuman and his team (lawyers Rosemary Gallo and Ira Markovitch)  are experienced child protection lawyers who know how the best ways to interact with a children’s aid society to protect the family and the children.   In this video, John Schuman, goes over the Ontario Family Law that parents should know when interacting with a children’s aid society. 

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28 - What to do when the Children's Aid Society Calls


As we are experts on children protection law, this website has additional information for parents.  See this page on what parents should do when a children’s aid society calls or  listen to the episode of the Ontario Family Law Podcast on the same topic.  This site also has information about how old children need to be to stay home alone, the law of spanking, what to do if the CAS wants to interview your children,  the legal duty of professionals to report child abuse, what grandparents can do if their grandchildren are taken by children’s aid, and what to do if you think your ex is an unfit parent, among many other topics related to child abuse and children’s rights. 


Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller
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Get it for Kobo

John Schuman’s book The Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law, has additional and more comprehensive information about child protection law and the court process that children’s aid societies use.   The $9.99 eBook is available for IMMEDIATE download from the Canadian Kindle StoreKobo or from iTunes for iPad, iPhone and Mac, or you can order the paperback.  That easy-to-understand book explains Ontario child protection proceedings and gives advice on how to get what you want in child protection court (as well as explaining the basics of most other issues in Ontario Family Law).

Available in iBookstore


John and his team are quick to act in child protection cases to prevent the children from being lost in “limbo,” while their knowledge of the area allows them to be thorough and ensure that all parties fulfill their responsibilities.  John’s team also provides advice and direction to clients about what to do out of the courtroom to make the most favourable impression on judges and succeed in the courtroom. Unfortunately, the rapid and comprehensive approach taken by John and his team does not work well within the Legal Aid framework.   We are not able to accept legal aid certificates on these matters and our initial retainers start at $7500.00, which allows out team to focus quickly on your case and do what needs to be done rapidly - usually before the first court appearance (this page explains why acting fast is critical).   Book a consultation with us by calling 416-446-5847, emailing John, or using the form below.  The cost for a consultation with John is $350.00 + HST.


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How To Stay Out of Court for Your Divorce


There was a time when getting a divorce meant both spouses had to go to court.  Those times are gone because many people, including Family Court Judges, have realized that Family Court is often not the best place for families to work out their issues and figure out how to move on with their lives, while protecting their kids from harmful conflict. For most people, going to court is the worst option for resolving matters after separation.  It is only in a few, more extreme, situation where Court is necessary.   Separated spouses can live much happier lives, while spending less time and much less money, if they pick the process option that is best for them.


In this video, Certified Specialist in Family Law,  Mediator, Arbitrator, Collaborative Lawyer and experienced court trial lawyer, John Schuman, goes over the options to court and explains how they may work best for you.  In previous videos, John explained the Family Court Procedure (step by step) and how what happens at family mediation.   If you are separated or separating, then you must know and understand your options. Choosing how you are going to work things out with your ex can dramatically affect how things turn out and how you live the rest of your life.  Make sure pick the path that will work best for you (and your kids) by watching these videos and having going over your options with an excellent family lawyer who can make sure you decisions are the best ones in your particular situation.

 

Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller
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For a more comprehensive, and comprehendible, explanation of both Family Court, and all there alternatives so you can work out what is best for you, get John’s best selling, easy-to-understand book on the Basics of Ontario Family Lawwhich fully explains family court and the family court process, negotiation, mediation, arbitration and collaborative practice.  The book is available both as paperback, and for immediate download as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  


Obviously, there can be a lot of money involved in child support cases  and only could really help a child with his or her needs (or not).  You need to get the help of a lawyer immediately to avoid financial hardship.  Contact Certified Specialist in Family Law (and author of the book above), John Schuman, by emailing him, calling 416-446-5847, or using the contact form below.  We answer all inquiries promptly and we can arrange for you to come in quickly for a consultation (charged at a reduced hourly rate).


Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below.


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Can Separated/Divorced Parents Agree the Child Support Guidelines are Wrong?


The Child Support Guidelines set how much money has to be paid between separated or divorced parents to help with the costs of raising the children. The exact support figures required by the Child Support Guidelines can come as surprise to some parents.  Others don’t like the strict rules for how child support is paid, or that there is no restriction on how a parent can use child support money.  After separating some parents want child support to work differently than set out by the Guidelines.


The reality is that the Child Support Guidelines are mandatory in most cases. Section 11(1)(b) of the Divorce Act, even prohibits judges from granting a divorce until child support is being paid that reflects the Child Support Guidelines. Getting around the Child Support Guidelines is very difficult as courts may ignore any agreement that is not in accordance with the Guidelines.  This can even create dangerous situations that backfire, such as when a spouse can be ordered to pay child support twice after making a lump sum child support payment


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10 - Child Support - Who Pays and How Much?

11 - Child Support's Special and Extraordinary Expenses

24 - How to Have a Valid and Enforceable Separation Agreement

In this informative video, Certified Specialist in Family Law, and expert on child support, divorce lawyer John Schuman, explains the situations where parents can make agreements for child support that are different from the Child Support Guidelines.  He explains what child support agreements have to say to be enforced by Family Court Judges.  He goes over the dangers of  making agreements for child support that are different from the Child Support Guidelines - especially the dangers inherent with lump sum child support, waiving financial disclosure or doing things differently after a child turns 18.  John then explains what parents have to do to have a court-enforceable separation agreement that does child support differently than in the Guidelines. Any parent who wants to set child support differently from the way the Child Support Guidelines say child support should work, must watch this video.


Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller
Available_on_Kindle_

If you need more information about child support, child custody or just about any other family law matter, get John’s best selling, easy-to-understand book on the Basics of Ontario Family Lawwhich has sections that fully explain marriage contracts and co-habitation agreements and an extensive explanation of what will happen if you do not have one of these contracts for your relationship.  The book is not only available as paperback, but also as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  

Get it for Kobo
Available in iBookstore


Obviously, there can be a lot of money involved in child support cases  and only could really help a child with his or her needs (or not).  You need to get the help of a lawyer immediately to avoid financial hardship.  Contact Certified Specialist in Family Law (and author of the book above), John Schuman, by emailing him, calling 416-446-5847, or using the contact form below.  We answer all inquiries promptly and we can arrange for you to come in quickly for a consultation (charged at a reduced hourly rate).


Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below.


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How to Save Your Marriage with a Marriage Contract


Financial stresses, especially when they are caused by one spouse more than the other, can put marriages, and common law relationships, into trouble. But that trouble does not mean there has to be a separation.  Top family law lawyers can advise about options that can keep the family and relationship together.  One way to do that is by using a marriage contract or cohabitation agreement one spouse can protect his or her savings, assets, credit or inheritance from the other spouse - especially where that spouse has been financially irresponsible.  Putting such a contract in place can remove the tension between spouses that exists when one spouse feels his or her partner is dragging him or her down or holding him or her back financially.  Removing that source of conflict can allow the marriage or relationship to flourish and blossom.


In this informative video, Certified Specialist in Family Law, John Schuman, explains how marriage contracts and cohabitation agreements can save a marriage or relationship. He goes over what these contracts can do to help ease tensions in the relationship and what these contracts cannot do. John describes some common family law mistakes that couples make and how a marriage contract or cohabitation agreement can prevent of fix those mistakes.  He also explains some of the rules for making a a marriage contract or cohabitation agreement. Watch this video to see if you can save your marriage or common law relationship.

Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law (Amazon Best Seller)

 


If you need more information about how to protect your assets or wealth during your marriage or common law relationship and after separation, pick up John’s best selling, easy-to-understand  book on the Basics of Ontario Family Law, which has sections that fully explain marriage contracts and co-habitation agreements and an extensive explanation of what will happen if you do not have one of these contracts for your relationship.  The book is not only available as paperback, but also as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  

Ontario Family Law Podcast (iTunes)

 

You may also want to listen to the Ontario Family Law Podcast episodes on:


One of the rules for having an enforceable marriage contract or cohabitation agreement is that both sides must speak to a lawyer and get independent legal advice one the contract. To find out whether contract is right for you, how the law applies specifically to your situation and what steps you should take to get things to work out for you, contact Certified Specialist in Family Law (and author of the book above), John Schuman, by emailing him, calling 416-446-5847, or using the contact form below.  We answer all inquiries promptly and we can arrange for you to come in quickly for a consultation (charged at a reduced hourly rate). 


Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below.


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Who Gets the Increase In Value in the Home After Separation?


With property values going up tens of thousands of dollars every year, and the family court process often taking more than a year to complete (which is why man people chose mediation or collaborative practice), who gets that additional money from the family home or matrimonial home can be an important issue in separation or divorce.   The answer to that question depends on the specific facts of each case.  Some facts that make a difference are whether the couple is married or common law, whether they own the house jointly, or only one spouse owns it, who paid the expenses of the home during the relationship and after, and several other factors can affect the answer.


In this informative video, Certified Specialist in Family Law, John Schuman, explains what happens to the increase value of the home after separation.  He explains when it is divided and when it is not, what separated spouses should do to makes sure they share in the full value of their homes and how Judges can correct unfairness.  Watch the video to make sure your home is divided fairly in separation or divorce.

Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller


available in iBookstore
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If you need more information about how to protect your home, your investments or your assets after separation, pick up John’s best selling, easy-to-understand $20 book on the Basics of Ontario Family Law.  It explains the law in more detail, gives some tips on what to do when the property division is working out badly, and sets out how to protect yourself whether you are dealing with your divorce in or outside of court.  The book is not only available as paperback, but also as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  

Ontario Family Law Podcast

You may also want to listen to the Ontario Family Law Podcast episodes on:


But the best way to protect yourself, your investment in your home and other things and people that are important to you, is to find out how the law applies specifically to your situation and what steps you should take to get things to work out for you. Contact Certified Specialist in Family Law (and author of the book above), John Schuman, by emailing him, calling 416-446-5847, or using the contact form below.  We answer all inquiries promptly and we can arrange for you to come in quickly for a consultation (charged at a reduced hourly rate). 


Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below.


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Losing Your Cottage To Your Spouse in Divorce


Even though your cottage may have been in your family for generations, it can be particularly vulnerable during a divorce.  Since the cottage can be a matrimonial home, your spouse can have the legal right to continue to use your cottage after separation and may be able to employ various strategies to get ownership of it through the property division process.  On the other hand, a spouse may not want to “separate” from a cottage after pouring his or her heart and soul into that “peace of paradise” even though it is owned entirely by his or her ex-spouse and family.  Many people are surprised at just how easy it can be to lose a cottage in the Ontario Divorce process.


In this informative video, Certified Specialist in Family Law, Divorce Lawyer John Schuman, explains how cottages can be at risk in a divorce   He also explains the steps you can take to protect your ownership of the cottage and everything that is at the cottage and how you can gain an interest in a cottage you do now own through your own hard work. In addition, John gives over how when Ontario’s Family Law results in a spouse losing a cottage unfairly, there are ways to correct that unfairness.  


To more specifics on why ex-spouses can keep using the cottage after divorce, check out this page on cottages, ex-spouses and divorces.

Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller


If you need more information about how to protect your cottage or your assets after separation, pick up John’s best selling, easy-to-understand $20 book on the Basics of Ontario Family Law.  It explains the law in more detail, gives some tips on what to do when the property division is working out badly, and sets out how to protect yourself whether you are dealing with your divorce in or outside of court.  The book is not only available as paperback, but also as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  

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You may also want to listen to the Ontario Family Law Podcast episodes on:


But the best way to protect yourself (and your cottage and other things and people that are important to you) is to find out how the law applies specifically to your situation and what steps you should take to get things to work out for you. Contact Certified Specialist in Family Law (and author of the book above), John Schuman, by emailing him, calling 416-446-5847, or using the contact form below.  We answer all inquiries promptly and we can arrange for you to come in quickly for a consultation (charged at a reduced hourly rate). 

Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below.


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Manitoba Parental Abduction Case


John Schuman describes the legal consequences for parents who take matters into their own hands, defy Family Court Orders, and abscond with the children in their child custody or divorce case.  These issues arose in the context of a Manitoba Case where the mother, who had lost custody, disappeared with the children. A Canada-Wide arrest warrant was issued for her arrest. 


Not being supportive of the other parent, acting unilaterally with respect to the children (especially in contravention of a court order) and not putting the children’s needs first are some of the best ways for a parent to lose custody of children.  There are other factors that judges consider when deciding child custody cases.


Three is a proper way to protect your children from imminent danger.  That is by getting an emergency order giving you custody of the children.  Taking matters into your own hands, and breaching court orders, is one of the best ways to lose your case - and possibly your kids.  That is the result in this case, where the mother ended up in jail and the children lost the opportunity to have their mother be a parent for them.


Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller

If your ex is preventing you from seeing your kids, read this page about what to do.  For information for what to do if a parent is abusing the kids, check out this page.   But, it these situations, the best thing to do is to meet with a top family law lawyer to make sure you have the best possible advocate protecting what is best for the kids.  To contact John Schuman, call 416-446-5847, email him, or use the form below to contact him.  We respond to all inquiries quickly.


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John is a top child custody lawyer and he has included a lot of information about child custody cases, how to win them, and how to look after your children in separation and divorce in his easy-to-understand book on Ontario Family Law, which is not only available as paperback, but also as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  The book not only explains custody and access, and how to deal with emergencies involving children, but also most other common family law issues.  It also explains how child custody cases in family court, in mediation, arbitration and in custody/access assessments.  There are many mistakes people can unknowing make in child custody cases, but John’s book explains how to avoid those mistakes and get the order or agreement that is best for your children.


Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below. You can also contact John Schuman using the phone number at the top of this page.


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Property Division in Divorce



That you automatically share ownership of everything with your spouse and that everything is divided 50/50 on separation are two common misunderstandings about Ontario Family Law.  In Ontario, only the value of some assets are divided, pension division is complicated and none of the family law property division rules apply for common law couples.  However, separating spouses misunderstanding of property division under Part 1 of Ontario’s Family Law Act can cost them thousands of dollars. 


In this informative video, Certified Specialist in Family Law, Divorce Lawyer John Schuman, explains how property division works during an Ontario Divorce.  He explains how that under the law, property is not divided, it is only the value of property - and it is not even really the value of property but the growth in value of property that spouses share.  In addition, there are some significant exceptions to that rule when it comes to matrimonial homes, gifts and inheritances, money from personal injury settlements or awards, and marriage contracts.  

John's podcast photo


In addition, when Ontario’s Family Law results in a really unfair situation, there are ways to correct that unfairness.  

9 - Property Division in Ontario After Marriage

In separation and divorce, it is crucial that the spouses understand how property division works.  This video gives an easy-to-understand overview of the Ontario Law on that subject, which can help spouses avoid making huge mistakes when separating


Guide to the Basics of Ontario Family Law Best Seller
Available_on_Kindle_
Available in iBookstore

 If you need more information about how to divide up your assets and liabilities after separation John’s best selling, easy-to-understand $20 book on the Basics of Ontario Family Law explains the law in more detail, gives some tips on what to do when the property division is working out badly, and sets out how the process works in and outside of court.  The book is not only available as paperback, but also as a $9.99 e-book for KindleKobo, or iPad/iPhone/Mac.  

Get it for Kobo


Feel free to share this video on your social network by clicking on the buttons below.  To contact John Schuman about your case, or comment on this video, use the form below.


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Spanking, Corporal Punishment and Canada’s Criminal Law (Canada AM)


John Schuman spoke to Canada AM host, Marci Ien, about spanking and corporal punishment under Canadian Law.  The issue arose in relation to two BC parents who were convicted of assaulting their daughter after using corporal punishment to punish her for “sexting.”   You can read the  complete story and watch the videos on this page.


Spanking and corporal punishment are legal in Canada, but as John describes in the interview, there are limits.  Crossing those limits can get parents, teachers, and others, in criminal court, or even jail.  Find out more about how the law treats spanking and corporal punishment on this page.


If a children’s aid society is calling to speak to you over concerns about corporal punishment or other forms of discipline, then you must read this page immediately. You should also contact an excellent child protection lawyer right away to avoid serious trouble from the police and CAS.


To contact John Schuman, call 416-446-5847, email him, or use the form below to contact him.  We respond to all inquiries quickly.  You can also use the form below to comment on tis story. Also, feel free to share this story on your social network using the buttons at the bottom of the page. 


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© John P. Schuman 2012-2017